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orrenm

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About orrenm

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  1. orrenm

    Novel and Screen Writing in Same Project

    It's absolutely possible. Just create two new text file documents, one a novel, one a screenplay. And yes, it makes sense to use one file for all your research data, characters, etc. I have one document for an entire series of novels, currently six novels and one novelette. One of my favorite aspects to Storyist is that you can keep everything you need for multiple works in the same universe in one document. Hope that helps, Orren
  2. Congratulations! Looks interesting (I'm a fantasy writer too ) Orren
  3. Very nice writeup! I did notice that the article states that the main feature of Scrivo Pro is that you can work with files exported from Scrivener. I guess the author didn't realize that you can do that now with Storyist iOS, too. Orren
  4. orrenm

    Tarkei Chronicles Published

    Yup, we all do. Orren
  5. orrenm

    Tarkei Chronicles Published

    I have never wondered! congrats!! Orren
  6. orrenm

    A question on headers and footers

    Thanks! Orren
  7. orrenm

    A question on headers and footers

    To add to this: While I certainly understand the drive for a "one stop shop" application that can do everything you want to do, there's a place in the world for specialized apps that can really do something well. That applies both to Storyist, as an excellent research/organization/brainstorming/manuscript tool, and to desktop publishing applications like Adobe InDesign. I lay my books out in InDesign; it gives you full layout options for facing pages (so you could have you book title on one page, your author name on another page, or whatever), the ability to make custom master pages, full typesetting controls, professional print output options as well as eBook options, and so on. Sure, Storyist can add layout design features, but it will never be InDesign. And InDesign can add manuscript features, but it will never be Storyist. And that's not a bad thing. Orren
  8. orrenm

    Support for tables?

    FYI, tables are really horrible in eBooks. Nearly every reader has problem rendering them, and your table is guaranteed to look different on every device/reader. If you must do a table specifically, and you plan on outputting an eBook, I would recommend making your table in Microsoft Excel (or an equivalent like the free Open Office, or if you're being held at gunpoint and threatened with death, that horrible waste of time and space Numbers). When you've got your table how you like it, save it as a .png graphic (you can capture a screenshot if you need to), and then include the graphic. That way the table will be "fixed" even as your text flows. Orren
  9. I was surprised, so I did a little digging. I guess Microsoft made it free around November: http://www.theverge.com/2014/11/6/7163789/microsoft-office-free-for-ipad-iphone-android FWIW, if you use Office apps every day as I do for my job, it's worth the $99/year anyway. But it's cool that they're giving away Office for iPad! Orren
  10. Without an Office 365 account, however, it is a free reader. If you wish to edit documents, you'll need the MS subscription. (which I have, BTW, and I think $99 for unlimited storage, mobile editing, and 5 installs is quite fair). Orren
  11. orrenm

    Styles.

    That's close to what she's saying, but not exact. She's saying if you have you novel as one big word file, have the word "chapter" at the front of each chapter, and then format the word "chapter" using a style that you create named Chapter Title that matches the Storyist style Chapter Title, Storyist will import each as a separate chapter inside a manuscript that can have it's own independent sections, etc. Orren
  12. orrenm

    Styles.

    I'm sure the styles have to have certain heading values set up, but you don't need to be in outline view. Assuming you have your Word Styles matching your Storyist styles, you just open your document, then select View Sidebar > Document Map and you get a sidebar with your chapter titles. You can then grab and drag them in the sidebar until your heart's content. Orren
  13. orrenm

    Styles.

    Actually, you can do this is Word for Windows. They haven't added this feature to MacWord, I wish they would. Orren
  14. orrenm

    Styles.

    Hi Fitch, I am confident you're not the dumbest person on the planet. Although you did put an "i" in my name when there isn't one, so you lose a couple of points for that. I think one of the confusing elements is that styles are "per document" and not "per project." (FWIW, I'd love global styles myself, so that the same styles would be available for every document, and changes I made for one style would be persistent). It sounds like you have imported document; they may have imported with no styles attached. If this is the case, you won't be able to edit any styles, as they're not there. I've never tried adding styles to a document without any. Maybe try the Import Styles command? I can certainly get you to a place where you can at least play with styles. 1. Start by clicking the "Create New Project" in the splash screen or File > New Project. In the template chooser, pick "blank" (although any will do). 2. Now either click the "+" button in the Project View, or select File > New > Text File. Select "Novel." (although, as above, any will do) Now, take a look at the Inspector (click the "i" icon on the top right of the Toolbar, or select View > Inspector > Show Inspector (or press Command + Option + i on your keyboard). The inspector will open on the right of your Storyist window. Make sure you're showing the "format inspector" which is the Inspector tab with the little paragraph symbol. The very first word in your inspector will be your currently active Style, and below that is a list of all Styles in the document. To the right of each style name, there's a downward pointing triangle (the "disclosure triangle.") Click on that, and you get options like Edit Style, Delete Style, Make New Style from Selection, etc. If you change something, and you want it to be persistent, be sure to choose either Redefine Style from Selection or Edit Style from that disclosure triangle menu. As I said, this should hold true for any text file type you create. Different text files have different styles attached to them by default. So the Notebook Entry text file will have different options than the Novel, and so on. As I said, styles are per document, not per project. So if you have perfectly edited the styles for one Novel and you want to use those same styles in another novel: • If it's another novel in the same project (for example, I have one project file for an entire series, there's currently 6 books in it) you have to right click on a novel with the desired style and choose "duplicate." • If you want to use the styles in another project altogether, you'll have to have your novel in the target project selected and choose Import Styles. This may be the way to add styles to your manuscripts without any styles BTW—try to Import Styles from the "Getting Started" document and see if it helps. Anyway, hopefully that will give you a place to start, at least. I don't think style handling is perfect in Storyist but I think it's very good. If you do eBooks, it also outputs clean XHTML, which is a very nice thing (you'd be surprised how much crap applications can add). I am with you that global styles would be a very cool thing, hopefully that's an option we get one day. Orren
  15. orrenm

    Proofreading Editor?

    I'm with M on this one: find a writer's group, or spend the money to hire a human being. Especially if you write a genre that likes to make up terminology (science fiction, fantasy) or you use dialect (think Huckleberry Finn), or are writing something like historical fiction and using diction and grammar from another era. Online proofers are just going to compare your words to a database of common issues; if you have an uncommon manuscript, you're out of luck. Just like getting an artist to design a proper cover, hiring an editor is what separates the professionals from the amateurs. And seriously—don't worry about "pre-proofreading." That's like washing your hair before you go to the barber. For basic spelling, that's when something like the spell checker in OS X or Microsoft Word is just fine. And for basic grammar, read your manuscript aloud, to yourself. You'd be surprised how many grammar errors come to light when you've just heard your sentence spoken out loud and it doesn't sound right. Orren
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