Jump to content
Storyist Forums
Sign in to follow this  
Steakpirate

The World of Voice Acting

Recommended Posts

Or as it's known elsewhere, the age-old art of reading papers into a microphone.

 

My dad's gotten back into voice acting as an extra source of income since the economy's hit the shitter, and he can't get much work as a tech consultant. As part of a barter deal for a new website with a Voice Over agency from his hometown, basically my entire direct family are now "represented" by the agency. (One of the paradoxes of the Voice-Over industry is that you have to have an agent to get an agent.)

 

As a result of this, I've started watching some instructional videos as a chance to see how the glove fits, and maybe help me pay for textbooks, clothes and food. Anyone else have any experience/relationship with the business?

 

I'll probably be auditioning for everything from the Cartoon Network adverts announcer to english anime dubs, we'll see how it goes, and I'll give you all a heads up if I actually ever land anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done voice acting for friends, nothing "in the business." It's usually been something along the lines of me fooling around, and then I get a random phone call from a friend of a friend who needs help with a final project...

 

How exactly do you audition for those things?

 

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've done voice acting for friends, nothing "in the business." It's usually been something along the lines of me fooling around, and then I get a random phone call from a friend of a friend who needs help with a final project...

 

How exactly do you audition for those things?

 

Good luck!

 

Yeah share the info, I'd love to try out, hehe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, as I'm not actually in the business yet, I can't tell you for certain. Most people get in through knowing people who are already doing it, like in their theatre groups or stuff.

There a few big websites where you can register as voice over talent for and stuff, but for some of them you need agency representation, and for just about all of them, there's a monthly fee.

 

Without an agency, you stand to make a lot less money, but you've gotta start somewhere.

 

 

In any case, from the videos I've been watching, it seems like the general formula is as follows:

 

Step 1: Take Voice Over classes

Other related classes are useful too.

 

Step 2: Put together a professional demo tape.

(Which is usually made up of an intro with your regular speaking voice, and several ads/readings. Traditionally, it's made up of commercials and characters you've actually done, but reading copy [the term for your lines, your reading piece, be it commercial, cartoon character, etc.] is acceptable, as it's mainly just a demonstration of your ability.)

 

You should have separate demos for commercials, animation and games and stuff. My dad's demo real was put together by one of the sound engineers for a workshop he was attending. It sounds like the real deal, because it's got sound effects and everything edited in.

 

Step 3: Get people to listen to your demo tape

Anyone and everyone who can potentially get you work should have a copy. But make sure it's good. It's supposed to be a showcase of your best stuff. You can even get in contact with names in the business, and, assuming they're polite, ask them how to get into the business. And then say, "Hey, you know I put together this demo reel, would you mind listening to it?"

 

The best way to network is, step one. Taking classes. You can meet people both in and entering the biz, swap demos, and if you become friends, mooch off their potential connections. There are also practice sessions directed by actual directors, so you're sort of paying to be seen.

 

There are a lot of ways to find out about auditions. As a lot of companies regularly look for new talent, you'll see ads in places like newspapers, but your best bet is probably one of those online sites for sheer volume. After getting the audition, well you have to win it. People in the biz claim something like a one job per 20 auditions ratio, which is probably why a lot of them stress auditioning as something they do for themselves.

Right now I'm watching a DVD called "Adventures in Voice Acting" by Bangzoom productions. It focuses solely on anime.

 

I would theoretically be able to jump the line somewhat, as my dad, being listed on a couple of these sites, could forward me stuff for my general vocal range. Or he might just tell someone in a given situation that he knows a guy for the job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...